Category Archives: Trumpets Yom Teruah

Feast of Trumpets 2020

Feast of Trumpets commences at sundown Friday, September 18, 2020.

Following is an excerpt from chapter 6 of my forthcoming book, “Escaping the Sunday Church.”

Feasts of Trumpets, Day of Atonement and Booths
I trust you can agree with my thinking on the pattern God is prophetically following in the events the feasts have predicted. The revelation of His plan for the ultimate enjoyment of His creation lies within the mystery of the last three feasts. The Messianic (and I’m talking to me too) must press into the understanding and observance of these ordained, holy times.
As with the first four feasts, each of the last three of the seven annual feasts has been given meaningful prophetic interpretation. Here again, to gain understanding of their purpose and celebration, submerge yourself in the Word. Engage your personal, reborn spirit in seeking understanding. Let your mind take a break until your spirit is inspired.
The following is not intended to instruct you, but is a brief insight into my spirit’s time spent in the Word.
Judaism celebrates the Feast of Trumpets (Yom Teruah in Hebrew) as Rosh HaShanah or New Year. We celebrate it in our family as Feast of Trumpets—a day for observing the shout-worthy blessing of our relationship with Messiah, the Father and the Spirit.
As with the other feasts, Trumpets is determined by God’s lunar calendar—the first day of the seventh lunar month following the month in which Passover falls.
This first month is referred to as Abib or Aviv in the book of Exodus. It’s name was changed to Nisan apparently during the Babylonian captivity of the Southern Kingdom. I’m not sure why.
Historically the first day of a lunar month is determined to be the day the moon’s crescent is at all visible. Some Messianics use only this method to determine the first day of a new month. I personally believe God has no problem with our having figured out how to forecast the moon phase.
It may seem like I have taken the proverbial rabbit trail in all my moon talk. The reason I spent your time reading the moon information is so I could make a prophetic point. Since Trumpets falls on the first day of the lunar month if you were watching for the first hint of moon crescent it could sort of sneak up on you. By the time you spotted it, the day may be pretty well in progress. That’s why
1 Thes 5:2, and especially 2 Peter 3:10, speaks of a “thief in the night. ” It is said to refer to the Feast of Trumpets as the day of the Messiah’s return—He will come at a unpredictable, predictable time!
That makes it easier to be jubilant with blowing of trumpets in announcement of Messiah’s return. And the possibility of that soon return gives emphasis to the celebration of the Feast of Trumpets.

Feast of Trumpets

Feast of Trumpets

Strange name for a feast, unless you’re a jazz fan, then maybe you’d relate better to Feast of Saxophones. However, the feast is really not about the instrument, but the experience of God’s voice—His instrument. Before I continue, I will add that the feast is to be celebrated on the first day of the Hebrew month of Tishri. (Lev 23:23), which happens to be September 10 in 2018.

Let’s start our story some two months after the Israelites have left the bondage of Egypt. They find themselves at the base of Mt Sinai. It was on this same mountain that Moses first encountered God. It was from a burning bush on this mountain that God began His conversations with Moses. These conversations would continue for forty years, but arguably the conversation God would have now at Sinai, not only with Moses, but with all Israel, is the most significant communication recorded in the bible.

The sages say that this conversation occurred on the first day of the seventh Hebrew month, Tishri, after the exodus from Egypt. This makes sense when you consider the time frame and that there is no other recorded historical event involving a trumpet other than the Sinai experience around this time. Also, God declared the observance of the feast shortly thereafter and before any other trumpet events, for example, Jericho.

So, given that this Sinai conversation is why the Lord commands the day to be observed, let’s consider it in more detail. The Israelites have been milling around the base of this mountain for the last three months. They’re still getting use to the freedom thing, collecting their mana every day except Sabbath and probably getting pretty bored. The context for the experience of the preeminent God conversation takes place over days of preparation as described in scripture.

Since they got here, their leader Moses has most likely made a few trips up the mountain looking for that burning bush and wondering, “now what?” It’s been a pretty awesome, almost incomprehensible unfolding drama since he was last here. He left being the shepherd of a herd of sheep, now he’s got responsibility for twelve tribes of his kinsmen adding up to maybe a million or so people. Looking down he sees them, they are spread out all around the base of this mountain and growing restless.

On one of these trips up the mountain God speaks to Moses giving him His vision and plan for the newly liberated people. Moses shares the plan and contingencies with the elders and gets a confirmation of agreement and reports back to God.

The stage is now set for God to reveal Himself to the people. This revealing is to affirm Moses as leader, but most importantly God will personally present His expectations of the people. These expectations will be an outline, not only for this people, but for all of His created humankind for the rest of eternity. Are you getting the magnitude of the conversation? How can the significance of this event be best communicated?

Speaking of a stage, can you imagine a better stage than this mountain rising up out of the desert floor? From this stage God delivered, by His voice that epochal communication, the Ten Commandments. This voice was modulated from an intense, terrifying trumpet-like sound down to an intelligible voice, which I’m sure still had plenty of volume to be easily heard and understood.

God choose not to stand on the stage in person, but, for divine drama, He draped it in cloud and darkness with some lightening flashes and fire for effect. God introduced Himself by the sound like a trumpet or more likely like a shofar (a ram’s horn, the original trumpet). Whether it emanated from Him personally or other heavenly personage I don’t know. But the same Hebrew word translated as trumpet “blast” is later translated in Exodus 19:19 as God’s “voice.” So, it does not seem too much of a stretch to me to believe the sound was from God.

I will not go into the consequences of the people’s experience and response to God’s manifestation on the mountain. I do believe the metaphor of the trumpet or shofar is very apt and perfectly appropriate for designating the feast’s identity. However, the paramount significance of the feast is the opportunity for me to reaffirm my agreement with and the embracing of God’s Law. It is a day for rejoicing in His goodness, His mercy and His loving kindness. Blowing my shofar might just help me underline my agreement with this event.

Celebrating the Future–Yom Teruah–Feast of Trumpets

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Celebrating the Future
Yom Teruah—the Feast of Trumpets

Today, September 20, 2017, at sundown, begins the lunar month of Tishri. Scripture, in Leviticus 23:23 and in Numbers 29 commands a day of rest, a Sabbath. This pause in our otherwise daily routine is for Yahweh’s children to remember and consider the momentous sounding of the shofar (trumpet) at Mt Sinai. It occurred during the early months after Israel’s departure from slavery’s bondage in Egypt. It was this intense sounding (teruah) of the shofar that announced God’s appearance before the gathered Israelites (native born and stranger). A blast of preparation for the unparalleled giving of the Ten Commandments and the Law (Torah). An event signaling the creation of a nation—a nation which was to be a light to the world. 

With the coming of Messiah, the Living Word, the Light of the World, the observance of Yom Teruah now celebrates our anticipation of Messiah’s return.  The sound of the trumpet (shofar) announces the descending of Messiah and the ascending of the saints, living and dead, to meet Him in the clouds and to usher Him into the coming of His Kingdom on earth. At this time Yeshua will bring forth the Torah from Zion. The nations of the earth will, for a thousand years, acknowledge the government of God. The saints will rule and reign in glorified bodies. 

Join me in joyous celebration, rest and prayerful anticipation of the coming trumpet call. Sound the shofar with enthusiasm—listening for that glorious response from heaven. 

My Thoughts on Yom Teruah

My thoughts on Yom Teruah
Yom Teruah (Trumpets or Rosh HaShanah) is the fourth of seven annual appointments (feasts) which the Lord has set to intentionally meet with His people. During the Gregorian (Western) calendar year of 2016 the feast is celebrated beginning at sundown October 2. This is the first day of the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. Each annual celebration renews in me a desire to more fully understand and embrace this feast.

First I will make a brief observation that this is my Messianic sense of the feast. I say “my” Messianic sense to be sure it is understood as being my experience and not necessarily a belief of others who profess a Messianic understanding.

Next, just to be clear, as a self-proclaimed Messianic, I am saying I believe that Yeshua (Jesus) is God come in the flesh, the promised Messiah. His shed blood, death and resurrection are God’s provision (grace) which enables me to keep God’s Word-Torah. This standard of conduct was recorded by Moses and amplified by Yeshua and the Apostles. My keeping of Torah frees me from the curse which would otherwise result from my imperfect ability to keep the commands.

The instructions to keep this fall feast are sparse—we are told to keep it annually as a memorial observed as a Sabbath (Lev 23:24 and Num 29:1). In Judaism it is kept as a New Year observance. It also ushers in the Ten Days of Awe in preparation for the next feast, Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement).

The word “memorial” used in the scripture connotes something that has happened which you want to remember. It may call for a resolution to remember so that it will not happen again. My brief word study of scripture brought up the first mention of trumpet as being at Mt. Sinai (Ex19, especially verse 13 and following). This was the mighty sustained, ear-piercing, rock-splitting shofar blast, trumpet blast, to announce God descending onto the mountain to speak to those gathered at its base. It is His first tangible appearance since He indirectly manifested through His miracles in Egypt. This Egypt scenario had resulted in the Israelites being freed and brought to this location before the mountain. The outcome of God’s visit from the mountain is recorded in Exodus 20:19—the people speaking: “You (Moses) speak with us (those assembled), and we will hear; but let not God speak with us lest we die.” Thus began 1500 years of indirect communication through priests, prophets and others (donkeys, for example) before the appearance of God come in the flesh—Yeshua!

I believe that year after year I and my generations have been called by the shofar blast on Yom Teruah to personally embrace and reaffirm the indwelling presence of Creator God—a memorial, if you will, to remind me not to reject Father’s desire to live big in me.

This celebration becomes then an annual heart check for stoniness—yet at the same time a day of unbounded joy because my God wants, desires and has provided for this personal, indwelling relationship through Messiah Yeshua.

What a blend of introspection, repentance, joy and celebration—let the shofar sound!

My Thoughts on Yom Teruah

My thoughts on Yom Teruah
Yom Teruah (Trumpets or Rosh HaShanah) is the fourth of seven annual appointments (feasts) the Lord has set to intentionally meet with His people. As my wife and I celebrate this year’s event I find an unusual call to an awareness of significance. Let me make a brief observation of my Messianic sense of the feast. I say “my” Messianic sense to be sure it is understood as my experience and not necessarily a belief of others who profess a Messianic understanding.

Next, just to be clear, as a self proclaimed Messianic, I am saying I believe that Yeshua (Jesus) is God come in the flesh, the promised Messiah. His death and resurrection is a God provision whereby I can keep all of God’s Word (Torah, as recorded by Moses as well as amplified by Yeshua and the Apostles) free from the curse which would otherwise result from my imperfect ability to keep it.

The instructions to keep this fall feast are sparse—we are told to keep it annually as a memorial observed as a Sabbath (Lev 23:24 and Num 29:1). In Judaism it is kept as a new year observance. It also ushers in the ten days of Awe in preparation for the next feast, Yom Kipper (Day of Atonement).

The word “memorial” connotes to me something that has happened and that you want to remember. It may call for a resolution in remembering that it does not happen again. A brief word study of scripture brought up the first mention of trumpet as being at Mt. Sinai (Exodus 19 especially verse 13 and following). This was the mighty sustained, ear piercing, rock splitting shofar (trumpet) blast announcing God descending on the mountain to speak to those gathered. It is His first tangible appearance, other than indirectly through manifested miracles in Egypt which resulted in bringing the Israelites to this location before the mountain. The outcome of God’s visit is recorded in Exodus 20:19: “You (Moses) speak with us (those assembled), and we will hear; but let not God speak with us lest we die.” Thus began 1500 years of indirect communication through priests, prophets and others (donkeys, for example) before the appearance of God come in the flesh, Yeshua!

I believe that year after year I and my generations have been called by the shofar blast on Yom Teruah to a personal embracing of relationship with Creator God in His manifest presence. A memorial, if you will, to remind me not to reject the desire of my Father for personal, indwelling presence. An annual heart check for stoniness! Yet, at the same time a day of unbounded joy because my God wants, desires and has provided for this personal, indwelling relationship through Messiah Yeshua.

What a blend of introspection, repentance, joy and celebration—let the shofar sound!