Category Archives: Ten Commandments

The Subtleties of Heresy

The Subtleties of Heresy

I had not considered specific heresies which might be in today’s ecclesia until participating in intercession with World for Jesus Ministries conference call May 24, 2020.

The intercession consisted of repentance for the ecclesia’s failure to keep the fourth Commandment—remember the Sabbath to keep it holy.

This failure could well be an example of a Nicolaitan heresy (1) that is being harbored and proclaimed by most of today’s ecclesia. It has been a heresy perpetuated through anti Semitic prejudice since at least the third century of the church. Why the Lord has tolerated a blatant violation of His word, I do not know.

It is my opinion that both Islam and Christianity by arbitrarily choosing a weekly holy day, other than the fourth commandment Saturday sabbath has an anti Semitic genesis. This prejudice is well documented by recorded history of both faiths.
By the time of Emperor Constantine and the Council of Nicaea in 325AD it seems much of the Christian Church’s doctrine is motivated by a “Christ killer” mentality. To me this is totally contrary to Paul the Apostle’s teaching in Romans (2) and Ephesians (3) where he speaks of the grafted-in, one new man being neither Jew nor Greek, male nor female. To create a distinction between Israelite (Jew) and Christian creates a “people” God never intended to define as His chosen. The distinction has failed to be made over the millennia between native born and grafted-in. The Church has opted to believe it supersedes God’s definition of chosen, replacing it.

It seems an oxymoron for the Catholic Church to claim Peter the Apostle as the rock upon which it is founded. Peter’s letters are addressed to Jewish believers in Messiah and amplify the definition of the “chosen people of God”. This broadened definition is really not new, but more of an understanding of what God had been defining as His chosen all along—one law for the native born and the believing gentile. Ex 12:49 The difference being the native born, by Messiah’s earthly time had become a broken off branch through disregard for the heart of God’s instruction in favor of man’s interpretation. Yeshua was often pointing out this distinction to the religious leadership of His day.

Peter was acknowledging in his letter the encompassing definition of priest—every believer, whether Jew or gentile, who professed faith in Messiah—sent by God for underlining the definition of His chosen.1 Peter 2:9

God has not abandoned His priestly call on the Levite (4). He has, however, through the faith of His elect in the shed blood sacrifice of Yeshua, made manifest His desire for the encompassing definition of priesthood expressed at Mt Sinai. Ex 19:6 (5)
Let our eyes be opened to the subtleties of heresy embraced by the ecclesia. Then through intercession personally repent for our personal accepting and harboring of heresy. Finally, we must stand in the gap (6) before Father that His chosen repent where they have failed to perceive their identity and calling, embracing heresies contrary to God’s word.

KB 5/27/20

1 See http://missionpossiblepeople.com/blog/ The Tribulation and Intercessory Prayer
2 Rom 11:11-24
3 Eph 2:11-19
4 Exodus 40:15 (NKJV)
5 And you shall be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation (in Hebrew “goy”—people including gentiles)
6 Ezek 22:30

An Awakened Spirit can Avoid a Dead Body

An Awakened Spirit can Avoid a Dead Body

It all started when I got to wondering about the word “profane” as used in the OId Testament. I had a feeling it meant to dishonor. While this is true, as with most Hebrew words there is a range of interpretation. Not only that, but there are two different Hebrew words that get translated as profane: zur and halal. Zur is the most frequently used word—76 times in the Old Testament, while halal is used only 21 times. Zur in the King James bible is almost exclusively translated as “strange.” But in many modern translations zur is translated as profane. Halal on the other hand is almost exclusively translated as profane.

So, you’re probably asking, “what’s your point?” Well, it’s this, my New King James Bible search of “profane” took me to the “profane” fire offered by Nadab and Abihu. How could their incense offering be profane? The offering was described by the Hebrew word zur—strange. Maybe then it was not the offering, but something more spiritually profound to which the Lord reacted.

Let’s revisit the event and see what might have been at play.
Nadab and Abihu, were the two eldest sons of Aaron, Moses’ brother.
Their tragic story is told primarily in the tenth chapter of Leviticus. The chapter opens describing the young men making an offering to the Lord which had not been commanded by God and which resulted in their death.

In acting as they did, Nadab and Abihu assumed a familiarity with God that was totally at odds with the solemnity of the occasion. They upstaged not only Moses, but also their father, Aaron, the High Priest. Their offering was a spontaneous act which they performed at the conclusion of at least seven days of very intense spiritual significance—the dedication of the priesthood.

Aaron and his four sons were each in their respective priestly garments. They were before the altar in the newly constructed Tabernacle. The sons’ father, the High Priest, had just blessed the thousands gathered to observe the event. The fire of the Lord had spectacularly roared forth and consumed the prescribed offering on the altar.

In their youth and in the exuberance of the event they apparently gave no thought as to how presumptuous and offensive their actions would be to God—how they were drawing attention to themselves and away from their father and from Moses. Their actions diminished the sacred impact of the pageantry of the event—Nadab and Abihu were editing the script—all this High Priest decorum wasn’t necessary, two kids with their own censers could define how you approached and worshipped God.

Their actions profaned, made God common, before the people. The judgment of Nadab and Abihu by God was deserved, swift and just. God did not want another repeat of the Israelites’ faithlessness evidenced at His descent on Mt Sinai the year before. It was there, gathered at the base of Mt Sinai, witnessing the awesome power of God, that the nation vacillated. In the intensity of that experience the Israelites opted to exchange an offered intimacy of relationship with God for one of intercession—as one voice they said, “Moses, you listen to God for us.” Now, in this climactic moment of pageantry in the dedication of the priesthood, God had to quickly, decisively restore His position of holiness, His preeminence and His plan for His chosen.

Although the text does not use both Hebrew words, I make the following distinction. The young men offered a strange, zur, offering, however, it was their inappropriate actions in the circumstance that profaned, made common, were halal to God. Nadab and Abihu attempted to define God in their image—to create a god that He is not—an idol god. Their individual spirit did not perceive God’s spirit—resulting in their dead bodies. God is a jealous God.

There is a tendency today to make God a buddy, a big, huggable bear. Let us not forget that although He loves each of us with a passion and is intimately approachable, He must be respected, esteemed, honored and worshipped. It is best to let Him decide how He wants to present Himself to us in any given situation. I may want the big teddy bear, but in His wisdom, I may need the correction of a father.

When my spirit is awake to His Spirit I will always make better choices, resulting in life for my body.

Yom Kippur–Day Ten–The Day

Yom Kippur Day Ten—The Day

It’s here, tenth of Tishri, tenth Day of Awe—Yom Kippur, Day of Atonement.

If you’ve followed my last two posts you are aware I am covering a commandment from the Ten Commandments each day from the Feast of Trumpets on 1 Tishri through 10 Tishri.

These ten days are called the Days of Awe, possibly because of the awesome experience the Lord intends Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, to be for those who celebrate it.

The tenth commandment says “You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not covet your neighbor’s wife, nor his male servant, nor his female servant, nor his ox, nor his donkey, nor anything that is your neighbor’s.” My first question was, “Why is this the tenth and final commandment?” You might say, why not? One had to be last why not this one? That was probably my answer before I started this study. I’ll explain:

Covet, to me, is a wizened word by itself. It just looks small and crunched up. It might even be deeply wrinkled and toothless. It surely has no vitality. Covet in the Hebrew is חמד (chamad) which translates, in addition to covet, to various shades of desire up to idolatry. I was going to do a word search of other occurrences of covet, but Ahab and Jezebel popped into my mind.

The whole sordid mess of these two is told in 1Kings 21. It’s got it all, practically the whole Ten Commandments in one story. And it starts with Ahab coveting the vineyard of his neighbor, Naboth. Ahab was even willing to pay for it. We have false witness, murder, parent-child considerations, stealing, idolatry and I bet Ahab didn’t keep Sabbath! It all started with Ahab just wanting a veggie garden.

The tenth commandment involves neighbor, as does Ahab’s story. I’ve previously covered the inclusiveness of this word in my ninth commandment review. I found it even includes my opponent. The final operative word of the “no covet” commandment, as I see it, is “anything.” This turns out to be the Hebrew word כל (kol). Translated an amazing 4000 plus times as “all.” Need I say more?

There are at least two morals to the story: First, what can start out as a seemingly reasonable want can rise to coveting when I let my mind and emotions out from under Spirit control. That wizened word can grow exponentially into full blown sin. Secondly, and maybe even more sobering on this day of confession, repentance and forgiveness is the generational consequence of sin. Read Ahab’s story to the end. As I repent I must take into account what I may have sown into the generational line and enlarge my repentance as required.

My premise is that the “no covet” commandment is totally appropriate for number ten. As the Ahab story points out, letting covet get out of hand can release a whole bevy of commandment consequence. The commandment gives you some examples where coveting is going to temp you, but winds up saying, כל—ALL coveting violates the commandment.

Wish I could leave you on a more positive note. But really, to think of the provision the Lord has made for our wholeness and the wholeness of our generational line is praiseworthy positive.

Yom tov.

Yom Kippur Preparation Day Nine

Yom Kippur Preparation Day Nine

Today at sundown begins the celebration of Yom Kippur. On this day nine of the Days of Awe I am considering the ninth commandment of the Ten Commandments. This commandment says, “you shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.“

This won’t take long, my nearest neighbor is a half mile away and I really don’t know him all that well. So, I’ve had no opportunity to bear a false witness against him. What’s that you say, Lord, “think again.“

Maybe I should not take the English translation quite so literally and do a little Hebrew word study. I’ll start with “neighbor,” that should end my inquiry pretty quickly. The Hebrew word is רע (rea). Oh, my, that has a translation definition ranging from “husband” to “opponent.” The predominant thought is “neighbor,” but even “friend” and “another” are frequent translations. Looks like I’ll have to expand considerably those who might be affected by false witness.

I’m almost afraid to see what “false” and “witness” encompass. But I press on—time’s running out to sundown. “False” turns out to be שקר (shequer), short definition includes deception, falsehood, disappointment and emphasis on lying. Before I start pleading guilty I’ll look at “witness.”

This is quick, the Hebrew is עד (ed)—basically to see and tell. I won’t even try to consider what I hear through the grape vine and tell. I think that falls into gossip. That’s a whole other subject.

Before I left the “false” definition, I was already thinking of innuendo. I don’t right out speak falsely, but if the hearer wants to make some assumptions from what I said, isn’t that his sin? Maybe I give the impression I was a witness. Maybe I leave out a fact or two. As I said, a shading of my testimony from which I could look better, the other worse. I’m the hero, the other the villain. And, this is no longer just my next door neighbor to whom I could have been a false witness. This group now includes friends. It includes a husband, maybe a wife too. And, can you imagine an opponent? I can’t even give a little shaded information about my opponent?

As you can imagine, I have some work to do before sundown.
Shabbat Shalom

Yom Kippur Preparation

Yom Kippur Preparation

My sharing on both Feast of Trumpets (embracing afresh the Ten Commandments) and Yom Kippur (how to afflict the soul) has prompted me to take a deliberate approach to the ten day timeframe which embraces these two events.

You may have already guessed at my thinking—Ten Commandments—ten days. Feast of Trumpets is on 1 Tishri and Yom Kippur on 10 Tishri. If I took a commandment a day and reviewed where I am in relation to that Commandment it could be an awesome Yom Kippur. This could be called the Ten Days of Awe. Maybe somebody already thought that.

Unfortunately I didn’t make the connection early enough this year to practice what I’m preaching, but I have practiced it for “adultery” commandment #7 and “steal” commandment #8.

“Steal” has been particularly rich. A small word study of “steal,” the Hebrew גנב ganab, indicates an influence of deception and stealthiness in the stealing. It even includes kidnapping as a translation. This got me to thinking beyond the literal, physical taking of property to the more subtle taking of the self worth, emotional wholeness, even to the point of taking another’s physical as well as mental health.

This line of interpretation opens a whole new opportunity for introspection. What have my actions been toward those I “love?” Have I been an encourager or a thief? What is the undertone in my encouragement—”that was good, but can’t you do better?”

As I get older I’m realizing memory can become a problem. To tell someone, “I told you, don’t you remember?” is like a theft, a condemnation, creating a doubt—a theft of confidence, self worth. Better, to just repeat without comment and even add a silent prayer!

Words, as has been said so often, have power. Words as a tool for stealing is a whole new consideration for me. Maybe with this Yom Kippur I can stop my stealing and instead start laying up some treasures in heaven where no theft can occur.