Tag Archives: Hebrew roots

A Sabbath Thought

Identity

(Exodus 31:12-18, Rom 11:16-17, Eph 1:20 & 2:6)


I sought for an identity,

I had no sense of worth,

Until Yeshua drew me and cleansed me,

And placed me on His throne. 

At the right hand of Father
I heard that ancient truth,

The one He spoke on Sinai’s mount:

”I, the Lord, do sanctify you and give to you as sign—

My Sabbath—keep it forever, evidence you are mine.”

Lacking identity no longer, I walk with inner strength,

Child of God forever, His  day I faithfully keep. 

Kennedy Brown
February 28, 2018

My Thoughts on Yom Teruah

My thoughts on Yom Teruah
Yom Teruah (Trumpets or Rosh HaShanah) is the fourth of seven annual appointments (feasts) which the Lord has set to intentionally meet with His people. During the Gregorian (Western) calendar year of 2016 the feast is celebrated beginning at sundown October 2. This is the first day of the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. Each annual celebration renews in me a desire to more fully understand and embrace this feast.

First I will make a brief observation that this is my Messianic sense of the feast. I say “my” Messianic sense to be sure it is understood as being my experience and not necessarily a belief of others who profess a Messianic understanding.

Next, just to be clear, as a self-proclaimed Messianic, I am saying I believe that Yeshua (Jesus) is God come in the flesh, the promised Messiah. His shed blood, death and resurrection are God’s provision (grace) which enables me to keep God’s Word-Torah. This standard of conduct was recorded by Moses and amplified by Yeshua and the Apostles. My keeping of Torah frees me from the curse which would otherwise result from my imperfect ability to keep the commands.

The instructions to keep this fall feast are sparse—we are told to keep it annually as a memorial observed as a Sabbath (Lev 23:24 and Num 29:1). In Judaism it is kept as a New Year observance. It also ushers in the Ten Days of Awe in preparation for the next feast, Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement).

The word “memorial” used in the scripture connotes something that has happened which you want to remember. It may call for a resolution to remember so that it will not happen again. My brief word study of scripture brought up the first mention of trumpet as being at Mt. Sinai (Ex19, especially verse 13 and following). This was the mighty sustained, ear-piercing, rock-splitting shofar blast, trumpet blast, to announce God descending onto the mountain to speak to those gathered at its base. It is His first tangible appearance since He indirectly manifested through His miracles in Egypt. This Egypt scenario had resulted in the Israelites being freed and brought to this location before the mountain. The outcome of God’s visit from the mountain is recorded in Exodus 20:19—the people speaking: “You (Moses) speak with us (those assembled), and we will hear; but let not God speak with us lest we die.” Thus began 1500 years of indirect communication through priests, prophets and others (donkeys, for example) before the appearance of God come in the flesh—Yeshua!

I believe that year after year I and my generations have been called by the shofar blast on Yom Teruah to personally embrace and reaffirm the indwelling presence of Creator God—a memorial, if you will, to remind me not to reject Father’s desire to live big in me.

This celebration becomes then an annual heart check for stoniness—yet at the same time a day of unbounded joy because my God wants, desires and has provided for this personal, indwelling relationship through Messiah Yeshua.

What a blend of introspection, repentance, joy and celebration—let the shofar sound!

A Psalm from a Bride

As I was reading Psalm 17 in Don Esposito’s bible translation Hebraic Roots Bible, I felt this inspiration to write a psalm. I have been working on being an author, but a psalmist? In any event, the words just seem to flow as I attempted to articulate in somewhat psalmist format the desire to worship as a bride Yeshua, my Bridegroom. As the effort progressed I realized that only as my spirit understood could my soul understand.

A Psalm from a Bride

A psalm I write,O Yeshua, with cadence ordered —
My soul’s words of measured stride —
Ascending for Your eternal awareness —
To my Bridegroom from His bride.

How do I march so with this masculine frame?
How can I seek Your face, Your embrace?
My soul knows only the calloused hand —
My soul knows only to love as a man.

It is my spirit which gives the count —
It is my spirit whose flights to heaven’s realms
Finds succor at Abba’s breast
And can guide my questioning soul.

My psalm, dear Yahweh, is now less strident
Perhaps this bride is less in feminine form —
But overflowing with my spirit’s trappings —
Expressing love — eternal, undying.

Kennedy Brown
Gerizim
December 18, 2015
Rev January 3, 2016

My Thoughts on Yom Teruah

My thoughts on Yom Teruah
Yom Teruah (Trumpets or Rosh HaShanah) is the fourth of seven annual appointments (feasts) the Lord has set to intentionally meet with His people. As my wife and I celebrate this year’s event I find an unusual call to an awareness of significance. Let me make a brief observation of my Messianic sense of the feast. I say “my” Messianic sense to be sure it is understood as my experience and not necessarily a belief of others who profess a Messianic understanding.

Next, just to be clear, as a self proclaimed Messianic, I am saying I believe that Yeshua (Jesus) is God come in the flesh, the promised Messiah. His death and resurrection is a God provision whereby I can keep all of God’s Word (Torah, as recorded by Moses as well as amplified by Yeshua and the Apostles) free from the curse which would otherwise result from my imperfect ability to keep it.

The instructions to keep this fall feast are sparse—we are told to keep it annually as a memorial observed as a Sabbath (Lev 23:24 and Num 29:1). In Judaism it is kept as a new year observance. It also ushers in the ten days of Awe in preparation for the next feast, Yom Kipper (Day of Atonement).

The word “memorial” connotes to me something that has happened and that you want to remember. It may call for a resolution in remembering that it does not happen again. A brief word study of scripture brought up the first mention of trumpet as being at Mt. Sinai (Exodus 19 especially verse 13 and following). This was the mighty sustained, ear piercing, rock splitting shofar (trumpet) blast announcing God descending on the mountain to speak to those gathered. It is His first tangible appearance, other than indirectly through manifested miracles in Egypt which resulted in bringing the Israelites to this location before the mountain. The outcome of God’s visit is recorded in Exodus 20:19: “You (Moses) speak with us (those assembled), and we will hear; but let not God speak with us lest we die.” Thus began 1500 years of indirect communication through priests, prophets and others (donkeys, for example) before the appearance of God come in the flesh, Yeshua!

I believe that year after year I and my generations have been called by the shofar blast on Yom Teruah to a personal embracing of relationship with Creator God in His manifest presence. A memorial, if you will, to remind me not to reject the desire of my Father for personal, indwelling presence. An annual heart check for stoniness! Yet, at the same time a day of unbounded joy because my God wants, desires and has provided for this personal, indwelling relationship through Messiah Yeshua.

What a blend of introspection, repentance, joy and celebration—let the shofar sound!

Let today be the day–it’s a new moon

Since sundown last night (8/15) it is the first day of the Hebrew calendar month of Elul. I have intended to be a more faithful observer of the new moons*–God’s cyclical, visual reminder of His plan of creation. The observance of each new moon can be an ongoing checklist of the spiritual progress we have made since the last celebration. It is commonly said it takes 28 days of doing to form a new habit. Just so happens that a typical moon cycle is 28 days!
From the Wikipedia excerpt below we find Judaism starts preparing for the fall feasts with the blowing of the shofar on 1 Elul and daily thereafter for the entire month. It represents a call to self examination and repentance in preparation for Rosh Hoshana, Yom Kipper and Sukkoth. It would seem even with our busy, frenetic western lifestyle we could give God a time daily to listen to His voice. That’s my resolution this first day of Elul.
From Wikipedia search “Elul” In the Jewish tradition, the month of Elul is a time of repentance in preparation for the High Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. The word “Elul” is similar to the root of the verb “search” in Aramaic. The Talmud writes that the Hebrew word “Elul” can be expanded as an acronym for “Ani L’dodi V’dodi Li” – “I am my beloved’s and my beloved is mine” (Song of Solomon 6:3). Elul is seen as a time to search one’s heart and draw close to God in preparation for the coming Day of Judgement, Rosh Hashanah, and Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur.[1]
*If you’re questioning a new moon observance, as I have, I’ll soon be posting my consideration of the the applicable scripture.