Tag Archives: Messianic

A Sabbath Thought

Identity

(Exodus 31:12-18, Rom 11:16-17, Eph 1:20 & 2:6)


I sought for an identity,

I had no sense of worth,

Until Yeshua drew me and cleansed me,

And placed me on His throne. 

At the right hand of Father
I heard that ancient truth,

The one He spoke on Sinai’s mount:

”I, the Lord, do sanctify you and give to you as sign—

My Sabbath—keep it forever, evidence you are mine.”

Lacking identity no longer, I walk with inner strength,

Child of God forever, His  day I faithfully keep. 

Kennedy Brown
February 28, 2018

The Shed Blood

The Shed Blood: the Firstborn, the Bondservant and Me

Before Egypt’s flight, blood placed on door post and lintel
Flowed from sacrifice of a perfect lamb. 
From the Death Angel the blood purchased Firstborn’s life —
Who with his family passed through that blood-marked portal
To begin freedom’s march to the promised land. 

Did Firstborn pause to consider
At what cost the blood was shed?

Two servants stand at the Master’s door
Each for six years has passed through in bondage.
Soon one will step over that threshold “free.”
The other chooses to remain at the Master’s side—
The portal marked with the blood of his decision.

The bondservant he would be called
His shed blood forever closing “freedom’s” door.

So, now do I too who walk with blood-bought freedom
Grasp that I walk so without cost?
That the blood through which I passed to life
Was the shed sacrifice of that Sinless Man?
Is there a choice which can be made?

Yes, there is a response which I can make—
The shed blood from my pierced ear.

The world’s “freedom” is not my choice.
True freedom leads me to the Master’s side,
There to remain—back turned to Babylon’s cry.
The bondservant’s life knows no greater freedom—
My ear’s blood on His door will forever testify. 

Kennedy Brown, August 22, 2017

Motivation for poem—
The theme of shed blood is common to three experiences of our faith: the Exodus from Egypt; the law of the bondservant and the sacrifice of Messiah Yeshua.

Deuteronomy 11:26-16:17, the Torah Parsha (portion) called Re’eh, speaks of the servant who prefers to remain with the master after his six years of service entitle him to a release from slavery to freedom—to become a bondservant. Perhaps he did not consider his six years of service as bondage. The procedure for establishing a bondservant as set forth in Deuteronomy is a restatement of the procedure first set forth in Ex 21:5-6. The procedure results in the servant placing an ear sgainst the Master’s door or doorpost where the ear is pierced. The blood from the piercing remaining as a reminder of the servant’s commitment.

This fact recalled to me the preparation for the final plague in the exodus account. There the blood from the sacrificed lamb was placed on the door post and lintel (Ex 12:5-7), its purpose to exempt the Firstborn from the Death Angel.

The next logical connection was the shed blood of the Lamb of God, Messiah Yeshua. His shed blood did not exempt Him from death, but evidenced Him as bondservant.

Drawing a poetic parallel was easy, Yeshua’s apostles often refer to themselves as bondservants. Should I do any less?

Shed Blood and the Master’s Side

Before Egypt’s flight, blood placed on door post and lintel
Flowed from sacrifice of a perfect lamb. 
From the Death Angel the blood purchased Firstborn’s life —
Who with his family passed through that blood-marked portal
To begin freedom’s march to the promised land. 

Did Firstborn pause to consider
At what cost the blood was shed?

Two servants stand at the Master’s door
Each for six years has passed through in bondage.
Soon one will step over that threshold “free.”
The other chooses to remain at the Master’s side—
The portal marked with the blood of his decision.

The bondservant he would be called
His shed blood forever closing “freedom’s” door.

The Firstborn and Freedman each seek Freedom.
In that struggle of life their strength will fail.
Firstborn will remember the shed blood that set him free.
Freedman will recall the shed blood on the Master’s door.
The same Author of each choice reaches out with open arms.

Firstborn and Freedman now hear true Freedom’s call—
Shedding blood from a pierced ear to gain Master’s embrace.

Man will never know true freedom away from the Master’s side.

Kennedy Brown, August 27, 2017

Motivation for poem—
Did you ever read the books popular in the 1980s where you could choose different paths offered by the author? You would wind up at different conclusions. They were the Choice Adventure series.

This poem is not the reader’s choice, but the author’s choice. I took the first four stanzas of the poem Shed Blood: the Firstborn; the Bondservant and Me and provided a different progression of the premise.

Both poems conclude there is no relationship that will satisfy apart from a bondservant relationship with the Master. This poem points out the illusion most of us had that we were the captains of our destiny. As I found in my personal experience, doing it in my strength was destined to fail. I also experienced the open arms of the Prodigal’s father receiving him (me) back.

The Eighth Day Approacheth

The Eighth Day Approacheth

On the Gregorian calendar the “eighth day” of Leviticus 23:34-36 begins at sundown, Sunday, October 23, 2016.

This passage in Leviticus describes the commanded Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot or Booths). It seems to present a quandary—celebrate it seven days and on the eighth day…. How can a seven day feast have eight days? Let me quote the verses for you with a couple of parenthetical additions of my own:
“Speak to the children of Israel (every engrafted believer in Messiah Yeshua), saying: ‘The fifteenth day of this seventh month shall be the Feast of Tabernacles for seven days to the Lord. On the first day there shall be a holy convocation. You shall do no customary work on it. For seven days you shall offer an offering made by fire to the Lord. (Then or After that,) On the eighth day you shall have a holy convocation, and you shall offer an offering made by fire to the Lord. It is a sacred assembly, and you shall do no customary work on it. Lev 23:34-36 NKJV

You’re already getting my drift by my insertions—you celebrate for seven days then on the eight day, after the feast is over, but before you start back to work—another Sabbath—before the new cycle begins with all its uncertainties.

It seems very appropriate to have a wind-up Sabbath. You’ve been celebrating for seven days to wrap-up a successful year—celebrating your freedom from slavery. I would say this Sabbath being the eighth day of the feast is celebrated as a day of new beginnings—a consecrated step into the unknown future—the coming year. What will it hold?

Those in Messiah Yeshua already have a big foot into facing that unknown—if they apprehend and walk in what they have already received! How better equipped could you be to step into the coming year than via the vehicle of a Sabbath dedicated to embracing the unknown—the eighth day! What an opportunity to lift to the Lord all those hazy, bogey men you may be seeing in the future (including the present political scene). Move into the challenge with your personal human spirit, not your doubting intellect. Move with confessed belief in the promise of Yehovah in Romans 8:28–And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.

The eighth day approacheth—it need not be feared—it can be embraced!

My Thoughts on Yom Teruah

My thoughts on Yom Teruah
Yom Teruah (Trumpets or Rosh HaShanah) is the fourth of seven annual appointments (feasts) which the Lord has set to intentionally meet with His people. During the Gregorian (Western) calendar year of 2016 the feast is celebrated beginning at sundown October 2. This is the first day of the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. Each annual celebration renews in me a desire to more fully understand and embrace this feast.

First I will make a brief observation that this is my Messianic sense of the feast. I say “my” Messianic sense to be sure it is understood as being my experience and not necessarily a belief of others who profess a Messianic understanding.

Next, just to be clear, as a self-proclaimed Messianic, I am saying I believe that Yeshua (Jesus) is God come in the flesh, the promised Messiah. His shed blood, death and resurrection are God’s provision (grace) which enables me to keep God’s Word-Torah. This standard of conduct was recorded by Moses and amplified by Yeshua and the Apostles. My keeping of Torah frees me from the curse which would otherwise result from my imperfect ability to keep the commands.

The instructions to keep this fall feast are sparse—we are told to keep it annually as a memorial observed as a Sabbath (Lev 23:24 and Num 29:1). In Judaism it is kept as a New Year observance. It also ushers in the Ten Days of Awe in preparation for the next feast, Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement).

The word “memorial” used in the scripture connotes something that has happened which you want to remember. It may call for a resolution to remember so that it will not happen again. My brief word study of scripture brought up the first mention of trumpet as being at Mt. Sinai (Ex19, especially verse 13 and following). This was the mighty sustained, ear-piercing, rock-splitting shofar blast, trumpet blast, to announce God descending onto the mountain to speak to those gathered at its base. It is His first tangible appearance since He indirectly manifested through His miracles in Egypt. This Egypt scenario had resulted in the Israelites being freed and brought to this location before the mountain. The outcome of God’s visit from the mountain is recorded in Exodus 20:19—the people speaking: “You (Moses) speak with us (those assembled), and we will hear; but let not God speak with us lest we die.” Thus began 1500 years of indirect communication through priests, prophets and others (donkeys, for example) before the appearance of God come in the flesh—Yeshua!

I believe that year after year I and my generations have been called by the shofar blast on Yom Teruah to personally embrace and reaffirm the indwelling presence of Creator God—a memorial, if you will, to remind me not to reject Father’s desire to live big in me.

This celebration becomes then an annual heart check for stoniness—yet at the same time a day of unbounded joy because my God wants, desires and has provided for this personal, indwelling relationship through Messiah Yeshua.

What a blend of introspection, repentance, joy and celebration—let the shofar sound!

Sins of the Fathers

Sins of the Fathers

In the Torah portion Chukat (Num 19:1-22:1) we find the Israelites for the second time approaching the river Jordan and entry into the promised land. But again as over 40 years ago they cry out, “If only we had died when our brethren died before the Lord! Why have you brought up the assembly of the Lord into this wilderness, that we and our animals should die here? And why have you made us come up out of Egypt, to bring us to this evil place? It is not a place of grain or figs or vines or pomegranates; nor is there any water to drink.”(Nu 21:3-5) How many times has Moses heard this grumbling lament from God’s chosen?

The first time is recorded as being sometime in the second month after their miraculous deliverance from Egypt; after the manna starts falling and quail has been provided. They’re thirsty and cry out, “Why is it you have brought us up out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and our livestock with thirst?” (Ex 16:2)

You might ask, “How could this new generation have possibly forgotten all the lessons learned for disobedience, rebellion, idol worship and lack of faith that has been experienced these past forty years?” The answer would seem to me to be one of sowing and reaping. It was Yahweh’s judgment in Numbers 14:29 that: “The carcasses of you who have complained against Me shall fall in this wilderness, all of you who were numbered, according to your entire number, from twenty years old and above.” Couple this with Yahweh’s pronouncement in Exodus 34:7 after the golden calf incident: , “The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, longsuffering, and abounding in goodness and truth, keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children and the children’s children to the third and the fourth generation.” (italics added) –the sins of the fathers would come home to roost—there would be a reaping.

At the time of this last iteration of water lack complaint, the entire assembly which had engaged in the pilgrimage of faithless wanderings was gone. Every one who had been twenty years of age or older was gone. Only Caleb and Joshua remained. Even Miriam and Aaron were gone. Moses’ denial of entry into the promised land was sealed. As an aside I questioned how Eleazar was still on the scene (Nu 26:1). Was he not clothed in priestly tunic along with his father, Aaron, and his brothers Nedab and Abihu? (Ex 29:9) Yes, he was, but he must have been less than 20 at the time of the Sinai census.

Back to my theme. We can so easily see the failings of the fathers from the perspective of Moses’ recording of the historical events which occurred as many as 3500 years ago. We can take admonition as to the need to avoid idol worship, disbelief and rebellion, but there is one other truth we must also come away with: the urgency as fathers and mothers to warn, admonish, cajole, entreat, implore, oh, yes, and pray for our children that they not walk in our sin—in the sins of their fathers.

In Yahweh’s pronouncement in Exodus 34:7, the operative word is visiting. This changes the charge from sin being a certainty to one that says our children and our children’s children will be visited. They will be tempted to sin as we have sinned—including their generational history of sin..

I submit that one of two things happened in the forty years of desert wanderings by the Israelites. Either the fathers were so self-absorbed and fatalistically oriented that they did not practice the instruction of the Shema and teach their children. Or, the children did not heed the teaching and admonition and failed as the opportunity (temptation) to repeat the sins of their parents were presented to them (visited upon them). The Shema is the ancient prayer/command from Deuteronomy 6:6-9 prayed today in Judaism and by Messianic believers alike. It says we are to teach our children.

An additional observation can also be made of the responsibility of our teen agers. Eleazar, the High Priest, at the time of the crossing over of the Jordan, was by then a man at least in his 50’s. He, along with all his contemporaries who were in their teens at Sinai and who also observed the response to the spies’ report, could have been a powerful influence on this second and third generation preparing to enter the promised land. They were now the leaders. Their voices should have forcefully warned the community of the danger of challenging Yahweh and Moses’ leadership. The record seems silent—the visiting was again successful. Today’s teens must not be oblivious to what is happening outside their world. They must observe and prepare for that day when their voice should be sounded to avoid the mistakes of our spiritual history—our sin.

Yahweh has made every provision for us to take heed and take a positive action. Has not the blood of Yeshua given us a perfect shield against the forces of the visit? Yes, but as with every generation, the human spirit must be alert and active, the will exercised to withstand successfully the attack of the visit—the sins of the fathers. The blood of Yeshua will stop the “visitors” from becoming “residents.”